Category Archives: Under Penalty of Perjury

Recap and Announcement

Updated: Feb 2016:  forgot to provide the new website mentioned below.  It is www.testingmaryland.com  Please visit, and let us know what you think.

 

This site was dedicated to learning about and exploring the truth concerning one person’s experience with another. The site expanded in ways that we didn’t originally plan for, and it wasn’t long before we outgrew the original intent while simultaneously reaching our goal. This site focused on one person, and what they were able seemingly able to achieve.

We originally sought to explore the following with our Pisces, Gail R. Proctor:

Here are the posts that have been done, that address each of the subject areas.

It all surfaced on mortgage applications for houses that were secretively in bankruptcy:

http://www.tocatchafish.net/being-stuck-in-fraud/

 

Which led to the REAL fake husband of Ms. Gail Renai Proctor’s that appears to be:  http://www.tocatchafish.net/bah-fraud-solve/

 

Which led to finding this:

http://www.tocatchafish.net/she-claims-she-is-married/

http://www.tocatchafish.net/mr-black-will-be-turning-60/

 

Is there disability fraud going on?

http://www.tocatchafish.net/maryland_and_full_disability/

 

False claims of Florida residency in order to avoid paying Maryland taxes

http://www.tocatchafish.net/maryland-tax-evasion/

 

Continuing to operate a business in Maryland without paying its MD personal property tax or filing a company tax returns with IRS

http://www.tocatchafish.net/md_corp_fraud/

 

Making false statements in order to try to quiet someone who knows your Federal fraud:

http://www.tocatchafish.net/pretend_victim/

 

Committing Bankruptcy fraud (same old pattern of fraudulent statements):

http://www.tocatchafish.net/bankruptcy-fraud/

 

The original questions we sought to answer were:

1) How easy is it for someone to defraud the Federal Government for years undetected?

2) Is it possible for someone to create a person out of thin air and get financial benefit from it for years?

3) Can a person take paperwork from a Federal agency, and submit an altered version of it to a related State agency, undetected, and get financial benefit?

4) Can a person claim a disability that doesn’t exist, and get paid for it?

5) How easy is it to conceal assets, stockpile money and give false statements on your Federal bankruptcy schedules under the alleged “penalty of perjury”?

6) How easy is it to claim that you live in a State that has no income taxes, in order to avoid paying taxes in another State where you do live (that has taxes)?

 

Clearly, the problem isn’t just the person who is doing the acts, but the people who help enable it and the systems that allow it. Hence, the creation of a new site with a new purpose! Stay tuned as we finalize that site and its’ contents. We will make the announcement on this one, and link the two of them together.

What Everyone Can Learn From Ray Rice and Bob McDonnell

   

In the past week, two high profile people were sent resounding messages by the court of public opinion and in one case, a jury of his peers. That message said that you should just tell the truth right from the start, instead of trying to carry people in the hope that they won’t be smart enough to put two and two together.

Ray Rice. Poor Ray Rice, and poor Janay Rice, and poor Rayven Rice. “I made a huge mistake, and I want to own it.” are the words that Ray Rice said in a press release this morning after being released by the Ravens football team. And yet, those who saw the original video where he dragged the lifeless body of his fiance out of the elevator and let her fall into a slump face down on the floor wonder when it was that he actually decided that it was a huge mistake. Did he know it was a mistake when he was kicking her legs out of the way of the elevator doors, or was it when he realized that his punch knocked her face into a rail and rendered her unconscious? No, those weren’t the times when he knew he had made a huge mistake, because he chose his career and multi-million dollar contract over telling the truth. It appears that the “huge mistake” he references is the one where he got caught, and (now) has no choice but to own it.

Similarly, Bob McDonnel, who was convicted on 11 felony charges in his corruption trial, thought that his definition of “corruption” was different than the one that jury had. According to THIS story, he painted himself to the media as a straight-laced guy who was a former military man and devoted family guy. As a result, no one would have expected the reality to be any different than the story: until undisputable facts surfaced that told a different story.

Sometimes, it really just comes down to being a case of did you do it, or not, without all the legal mumbo-jumbo that lawyers will try to bring onto the scene in order to distract everyone from that core question. The jury didn’t buy the argument that he didn’t know that what he was doing was wrong. And the public haven’t bought the story that Ray Rice didn’t know his vicious role in what happened in that elevator, or the possible price he might pay if it was discovered as it has now been.

As the saying goes: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

 

http://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/tv/z-on-tv-blog/bal-ray-rice-video-tmz-enduring-power-image-20140908,0,5703020.story

images

Crying “Wolf”, and the Documents That Called Her Bluff

 

Initially, it seemed like a cut-and-dry case of a woman veteran experiencing an unthinkable act of hatred by the hands of a horrible patron. The story of Dayna Morales, a gay former Marine and New Jersey restaurant worker, quickly spread on social media and in the news as people were simultaneously appalled and quick to believe her story. As the STORY goes, a customer allegedly refused to give her a money tip but gave her a tip about the reason why. Morales put a picture of the receipt, with the written “tip”, up on the internet. As sympathetic people rallied around her with their words and money, she raised the stakes a notch by claiming she was going to give a portion of the money she was receiving to the Wounded Warriors Project.

But wait! Days later, the family came forward to NBC4 to produce their copy of the receipt that showed that a money tip had been left for Morales. Although the story UPDATE reports that the family said it “…shows they paid a tip and didn’t write any such note”, their receipt wouldn’t show the note part since it is not a carbon copy of the merchant copy. The family showed their credit card statement which showed the total charge, which included a tip. When called to the carpet by the news station, the restaurant manager and owner wouldn’t produce the receipt that would have shown what got written.

But wait! More days went by, and an investigation ensued. That’s when things got really interesting. A source in the Pentagon confirmed that she had been dishonorably discharged from the Marines. A previous co-worker of Morales was contacted, and reported that she had suddenly quit her job at some point after having told co-workers that she had brain cancer. Apparently, the chic thing to do these days is to use a real or imagined medical ailment in order to gain sympathy and monetary benefit. No one thought that this sort of thing was only going on in the DMV area, but the similarities between this story and the Proctor/Jareaux story in Maryland are striking.

Documents tell stories, and the ones that are proven to be false and fabricated tell an even bigger story. People tell lies for reasons. Some are better at the game than others. Great job to the family that called this woman out on her lies. Morales is now being quiet. With all eyes on her now, her silence is telling a story also.

MjAxMy05OTI2YTVjZTkwZjdjNDU5Card can be found at the following location:

 

 

 

 

SSDI: Half Would Be Outraged, Half Would Apply For Benefits

The headlines are everywhere: the SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) fund is set to run out in late 2016 if something isn’t done to replenish it.  It’s not that most people don’t see the need for it, but with the fraud, waste and abuse that plagues the Social Security system, people don’t want it to be reauthorized without some reforms put into place to help curb the fraud, waste and abuse.  According to THIS NBC News article, changes made in 1995 opened the door to get benefits for certain disorders.  The number of “Musculoskeletal conditions and mental health disorders” claims has exploded. What happens when a backlog happens in a system where performance is judged by quantity instead of quality?

Corners are cut.

And what typically can be found in places where corners are cut?

Fraud, lies, greed, and theft.

When you first make a disability claim, you can expect that it will likely get denied.  There’s no shortage of internet sites that tell you this and all about the process.  A Residual Functional Capacity (RFC) is compiled with input from the Disability Determination Services (DDS) agency and information documented from your doctor.  The goal for someone who really doesn’t want to work apparently is to get an RFC that says you aren’t even capable of doing “sedentary work”. What is that?  It means you can’t lift more than 10 pounds at a time, mostly sit with occasionally walking and standing. The disability examiner determines, given your skills, age and abilities, if you can be taught another job.  If you are making a claim for physical disabilities, it’s completed by a physician.  If it’s for mental ones, a psychologist or psychiatrist will reference your mental symptoms that affect your ability to work. Site after site recommends you have an attorney to help you navigate through the denials you are likely to get.  And when you do, here’s what they won’t tell you, but should: if you aren’t supposed to be working, then DON’T.  Also, if you’re caught pretending, faking or malingering, you can go to prison.

Attorneys know, hear about, or learn which judges tend to do what.  You can even find the claim approval statistics BY JUDGE for the Administrative Law Judges on the internet! HERE it is for Maryland. The danger comes when an attorney, more focused on winning at all costs for his/her client, helps the client to bend and fudge the facts instead of protecting the very system they may one-day need from abuse.

A report was released by the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, available by clicking HERE, that is sub-titled “How Rubber-Stamping Disability Judges Cost Hundreds of Billions of Taxpayer Dollars”.  As a result of the rampant fraud and abuse of the SSA benefits system, investigations are on the rise.  And when a person, determined to lie to get benefits, hires a lawyer who colludes with your lies, the clock starts ticking.  See THIS story about the scheme by Judge David B. Daugherty and attorney Eric Conn (appropriate last name) to defraud the SSDI system by fast-tracking claims through the administrative hearing process for people who very likely didn’t deserve benefits at all.  How do you get the medical data to support it?  Easy!  Use doctors recommended by your lawyer who “you could get them to do what you want”.

I found and watched the 60 Minutes story on the disability fraud, and you can too by clicking HERE. The Vice President of the Association of Administrative Law Judges, Marilyn Zahm, said “if the American public knew what was going on in our system, half would be outraged and the other half would apply for benefits.”  I know which half I am, and I know a few people who have shamelessly and shamefully applied for benefits.  Read the comments on the video site.  Others apparently know of them too.

Using Surveillance to Catch Disability Fraud

Fraudulent claims for disability have been a problem for the Social Security Administration for years.  The ways that fraud investigators find the fraudster range from simply putting two and two together with documents, to relying on anonymous tips via their fraud hotline. In between, investigators often root out the fraudster from simply watching them.  It happens more and more these days.

THIS guy was receiving more than $6000 per month for his “disability”, but meanwhile was seen playing basketball, doing yardwork, and washing his boat that the author says was probably purchased using his disability payments.  He was getting money from SSA and Veteran’s Affairs.

THIS woman was caught committing worker’s comp fraud by using video surveillance.  One minute, she needed a cane and a brace, and the next she could function just fine without it.

The Social Security Administration has a Cooperative Disability Investigations Program that routinely employs the use of video surveillance in order to catch fraudsters.  A few of their cases can be read about by clicking HERE.  More can be found on video surveillance by clicking HERE.  An attorney did a nice writeup about the ways that surveillance is conducted.  It includes interviewing 3rd parties and reviewing information found on social media.

THIS story reports on the retired officers and firefighters who were charged with making fraudulent PTSD claims for disability to the Social Security Administration.  There were more than 100 of them. On their paperwork, apparently they kept writing that “I’m unable to perform any type of work activity in or out of the house”.  But they were found to be jet skiing, piloting planes and doing work.  If you write that you can’t do things, than don’t be seen or heard doing those things.  Period.

You should especially not be out in very public venues doing any of the things that you attested to not being able to do.  Being on The Price is Right, grabbing the big wheel when you are getting disability pay for a shoulder injury, is a no-no. Going zip-lining while on vacation with your partner, is another.  I’d like to know how they found out what Cathy Cashwell was doing while on vacation! (ooh, it’s probably by first checking bank and credit card statements and getting it confirmed from pictures!) It’s called malingering (faking an illness for personal gain).  The Form 3368 for a malingerer, makes for interesting and entertaining reading indeed!  A note to fraudsters: if the doctor you listed in Section 8 is someone who is known to certify for bogus claims, you may want to turn yourself in before you are caught. And shame on you for listing and wasting good meds that could be used for someone who really intends to take them.

How can you get away with disability fraud?  Here’s advice from the investigator written about in the story above: ““The best way and only way of beating the system is completely staying in your house, not leaving for three to five years.” Cathy, I bet you don’t have that smile you had on the Price is Right video now!

Bankruptcy Attorneys Being Naughty

I don’t think that anyone truly thinks that fraud and actions to cover up fraud don’t exist in our world. I myself have spent many times around the watercooler at my job, talking with co-workers about the lengths that people go to in order to make it that their illegal actions don’t see the light of day. What we are blown away by are stories where attorneys are doing the illegal activities to help their client who has been fraudulent in the first place. The last blog post sparked our interest in these sorts of situations.

And they do happen.

The good news for those of us who think there is no hope for a system where these things are tolerated by the very officers who are entrusted with the care of that system, is that they often times get caught. That is the subject of my post: those naughty bankruptcy attorneys.

Federal Rule of Bankruptcy Procedure 9011 provides guidance about an attorney’s filings:

“The attorney “is certifying that to the best of the person’s knowledge, information, and belief, formed after an inquiry reasonable under the circumstances” that the information presented by the attorney to the court is such.

So you can’t just upload things just because you feel like it, and you can’t to purposefully cause delay, and you can’t to try to increase the cost of litigations, and you can’t make allegations unless you have evidentiary support for them. So actually I wrote it wrong to say “you can’t”. You CAN, but doing so will subject you to sanctions, and a nice big fat Order for Show Cause that starts the ball rolling. Bankruptcy courts can impose sanctions in three situations: where papers that are submitted demonstrate factual frivolity, legal frivolity, or where papers are submitted for an ‘improper purpose.’ Attorneys have been penalized by the bankruptcy court for their actions.  THIS case involves sanctions against an attorney who advised their client not to disclose assets. And THIS case shows the importance of the attorney having information to back up their claims, and what happens when your client contradicts their facts to save themselves.
At all times once an attorney is retained as their counsel, it is THEY who are running the show and are responsible for authenticity of information on schedules. It doesn’t work to say you believed what your client told you about the amount in their accounts or their income amount, if you don’t get the statements to corroborate what they’ve said. Attorneys are responsible for doing discovery on their clients’ information BEFORE filing things in the court about them. Not that you can’t do that, but if you do, it is your ass in the sling swinging in front of the Judge at your Show Cause hearing. It’s also a no-no to repeatedly submit unconfirmable plans (see Dahlgren v. Palone case), and to do so in a deliberate attempt to multiply or delay proceedings subjects the attorney to sanctions also. It’s a privilege to operate in the court, and if you abuse it by being negligent, too bad for you (see Thao Tran).

Finally, it’s worth mentioning that an attorney’s show cause hearing isn’t the place for them to lie about what or why they did what they did. Ask Kathy Cruz, who put wrong information on schedules that affected funds available to creditors, mischaracterized monies in order to obtain confirmation for their client, and then made misrepresentations in her show cause hearing to the Judge about her actions. Fines, mandatory reeducation and suspension of practice for 6 months. Was that little money your client gave you really worth all of that, Kathy? Kathy isn’t alone. If attorneys think they can get one over on a determined Judge, just look at this case, also found on the internet, involving what at first was an attorney not using Federal upload system in accordance with the Rules:

Download (PDF, 127KB)

There is a blog post found HERE, where an attorney asks “what has happened to honesty in the Bar, for Pete’s sake?” We applaud any avenues that exist to bring out and showcase the fraudulent behavior of clients hell-bent on committing bankruptcy fraud, and their attorneys who are determined to “win” by any means necessary to help them.  At some point, it becomes clear that your client is committing fraud, and an attorney that keeps walking beside them to help them do it… well, hopefully they don’t mind their character and reputation being judged accordingly.  Birds of a feather, do tend to flock together!

We Would All Hide Assets And Ride Off Into the Sunset of Retirement

That’s what the U.S. Attorney said to the jury for the trial in Federal court of a woman charged with committing Social Security and Bankruptcy fraud. What follows is a writeup of a woman who was caught doing the very things that I’ve seen happen in a bankruptcy case that I am involved in. I have been wondering what the possible penalties are for people who actually get caught and charged, and the story of Sheryl Bruner provides some guidance.

Poor Bruner. An upstanding woman who was receiving disability pay and trying to be a good citizen, but whom was overwhelmed with her bills and debts. She filed for bankruptcy protection to try to get that “Fresh Start” that all Americans are entitled to seek. Only, Bruner wasn’t the poor soul that she painted herself to be in her bankruptcy petition.

I’ll let you read the linked story found on Fraud of the Day’s website, found HERE, to read Larry’s take on the story. She was running companies, lying on her Social Security recertification statements about her activities, and concealing assets such as a TD Ameritrade account; a stash of money in her house; bank accounts not on schedules, assets not disclosed, etc. Ah, so people DO get charged with bankruptcy fraud for doing those things! When I read about her car, paid for in cash, I almost thought I was experiencing dejavu! When I read that she thought she didn’t have to disclose things about her assets and activities that were involved with her LLC, I knew it was dejavu.

Gotta love when someone tries to throw their attorney under the bus by saying that they did something or filed something that they weren’t aware of (which is malpractice). Gotta love even more the prosecuting attorney who plays an audio tape of the debtor’s statement in their meeting of creditors that confirms what all debtors are asked: did you see, read and sign your petition? YES, she did. And no Sheryl, it doesn’t work to try to allege that your lawyers were shady if you didn’t complain to what is known here in Maryland as the Attorney Grievance Commission. Her lawyer, who tried to “defend” his client by essentially defaming her bankruptcy counsel, said that he was doing so because of his obligation to his client. The U.S. District Judge that heard the case was not convinced, reporting that she was going to investigate the matter and hold the defense attorney accountable for his actions.

Apparently, Ms. Bruner thought she could try to hide behind the fabricated actions of someone else in order to try to cast doubt regarding what were HER fraudulent actions. Pay attention: it is the debtor’s responsibility to ensure that the information contained on the bankruptcy petition is correct prior to the attorney uploading it to the Federal docket. The attorney only knows what their client tells them, which is why they are supposed to get the statements from the client that shows the truth. If a client decides to withhold info from their lawyer, then it is the CLIENT who is committing fraud. Doesn’t matter if you amend your schedules later to add things because you found out that questions were being asked. That’s called Trying to Feign Compliance After Your Crime. The jury didn’t buy it, and it took about two hours for them to convict her. You can read HERE for another perspective about this story.

The U.S. Attorney said that the woman “never misses an opportunity to game the system”. Unfortunate that she had to put her retirement and freedom at risk by being so greedy. More unfortunate that she, like others, think they can continue to use that same system to try to get them out of the trouble resulting from that gaming/fraud. Larry wrote “Compulsive lying got this fraudster into a heap of trouble that will most certainly give her plenty of time behind bars to work on breaking her bad habit.” In my experience with someone with similar tendencies, some habits can’t be broken. Especially if the person has no remorse, and believes that they only thing “wrong” is that they got caught.

For those that asked for information regarding the fraud charges Bruner faced, here is the indictment:

Download (PDF, 298KB)

And here is more about her seized money, and what she tried to do with it:

Download (PDF, 223KB)

 

You can find more about her various filings in her defense of the charges by doing an internet search. You will see them all.

It is STILL the case that…

We can all help one another stop bankruptcy fraud

Maryland Insurance Fraud Raises Rates

Insurance is mandatory for a homeowner to have on a house that has a mortgage. You won’t be able to go to settlement without having an insurance policy (if you have a lender), and if you lose the coverage, it will be placed forcibly by the mortgage company. Every homeowner’s policy is priced in accordance with where the house is located, what is in the house, what materials it is made of, and who the homeowner is. In addition, your premium depends on the overall cost of doing business for the insurance company.

It is therefore in the best interests of the homeowners to be vigilant in their claims process, since it ultimately will affect them financially in the long run. I would also say that it is in the best interests of the insurance companies to be equally vigilant. They seem to agree. Insurance fraud is estimated to be increasing household insurance premiums by an average of $1000 per year.

In the state of Maryland, the Maryland Insurance Administration is, according to its’ website, an “independent state agency that regulates Maryland’s insurance industry and protects consumers by enforcing insurance laws.” One of their responsibilities is to “Investigate acts of insurance fraud”. So what is insurance fraud? It happens when someone files a false claim for damages, or does something to deceive an insurance company in order to profit financially. I should know. I am indirectly involved in something that looks like fraud to me.

I was notified about an alleged fire that happened at one of the houses I co-own. Except I wasn’t told about it until I was asked to sign the insurance payout check. Supposedly, a fire happened next door, causing electrical damage to our property. Supposedly, a guy was paid to put new electrical wiring into the damaged house, and fix the walls he was going to have to tear out in order to do so. The receipt I was provided to substantiate the claim differed from the other two versions that had been provided to other parties (one being the insurance company themselves). They had been obviously altered with whiteout by someone. This was just the start of trouble.

I couldn’t quite figure out how a claim was paid on a policy that bore two names, with only one person’s signature approving the claim. The Maryland Fair Plan, which is the insurance company, said (when I pressed the issue) that they actually only needed ONE signature in order to process the claim. Okay, if you say so, though it sounds wrong. But then there was the matter of HOW and WHY did the insurance company leave off the name of our mortgagee from the insurance check? When there is a lien on your car, or a mortgage on your home, the insurance claim check is made out to ALL parties who have an interest in the property. Meaning, your car loan or house note company is going to be on the check. Yet, it wasn’t done in this situation. Hmmm.

What was the most troubling part is when I found out that the electrical work hadn’t actually been done in the kitchen of the house (majority of fire damage), which caused the house to fail its’ inspection with the Housing Choice Voucher folks in Baltimore, which triggered the tenant to be issued a voucher to move (which she did). Clearly, the electrical work that the insurance company thought was done, hadn’t actually been done. Yet, a claim worth almost $4000 had been paid out as if it had been done.

When I tried to inform the insurance company that I was uncomfortable with the circumstances regarding the alleged fire, alleged damages, alleged electrical work, my missing signature, and the mortgage company’s missing name, they acted as if they didn’t understand why I had a problem with any of it. Almost like those sorts of things are routine for them.

“..deceive an insurance company in order to make money”, that’s what the site says. When it looks like fraud, reads like fraud, it likely IS fraud. If that was routine for insurance companies, Why? Do they have any responsibility? They do, if they won’t even take their own policyholders seriously, who are telling them that something is not right. Maybe it needs to be like the story below to get their attention. In the meantime, it got my attention, since my insurance premiums have been raised as a result of the greed of another. See HERE.

You’ll notice in the story, these words: “in good faith — accepted Levonian’s word.” Perhaps that was the largest part of the problem, as this site continues to point out.

For you, Maryland Joint Insurance:

http://www.nytimes.com/1993/07/19/nyregion/a-failure-to-battle-fraud-bleeds-empire-of-millions.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2013/08/26/where-theres-smoke-theres-fire-red-flags?t=education-training

 

What price would YOU pay for bankruptcy fraud?

This segment reports on the antics of Steven K. Zinnel, who got himself into serious trouble when he planned and decided to commit bankruptcy fraud.  Bankruptcy fraud isn’t such the big story with this case, but what is interesting is the way that his fraud got detected and the fallout from it.  First, some backstory.

Mr. Zinnel went through a horrible divorce and child support battle with his now ex-wife.  Mr. Zinnel was a businessman with significant holdings and assets, but he wanted to control how much of it would be given to his ex-wife or kids.  Essentially, he didn’t want to be told by the State court how much of his money would be given for his obligations.  So what did he do?  He filed personal bankruptcy.  Best way to get protection is the Federal kind, while in bankruptcy.  Because of the nature of the relationship between he and his ex, she knew information about his holdings, and he knew that.  She wasn’t going to make it easy for him to just screw her and the kids out of what would rightfully be theirs otherwise.

Here’s where it gets interesting.  Zinnel decided, along with his attorney, Derian Eidson, that they would set up trusts and companies in a way that would shield his assets from detection from the bankruptcy trustee.  He put property into other peoples’ names both before and after his bankruptcy too.  THAT, is a no-no.  Zinnel apparently made it clear in the divorce case that he believed he could conceal his true financial picture in order to avoid his financial obligations (his kids).  He wanted a little bit of help to achieve his goal of getting his wife off his trail, so he did what anyone would do: he contacted the FBI.  His ex was making things uncomfortable for him by requesting records about him, so he decided to make things uncomfortable for her.  He asked the FBI to investigate his ex-wife for requesting the records.   According to THIS write-up on the story, “According to papers on file with the court, when agents followed up on Zinnel’s call to the FBI, his own bankruptcy crimes were discovered.”  According to the write-up by TIME found HERE, Zinnel’s BK judge noted that, “having roused the beast, like the professor in Frankenstein, [Zinnel] was soon fighting off his own creation.”  It took a while, but the FBI was able to piece together his asset transfers, saw the sources of his income that he didn’t declare, and found the proof of his various bankruptcy frauds.

Oh, and let’s not forget about his female lawyer that put her own credentials on the line in order to assist her client with his fraud.  Difficult to imagine that an attorney would be so focused on winning for their client, that they would be willing to lie for them and help them commit fraud.  Clean hands doctrine, anyone?  Eidson was convicted of one count of conspiracy, and one of attempting to commit money laundering.  She also had to forfeit assets due to her conduct.  One has to wonder how much her integrity was bought for, assuming she had it to begin with?

 

Zinnel tried to appeal his bankruptcy, but it got stayed until after the criminal proceedings were completed.  You can read about that by going HERE.  Zinnel’s Judge had this to say: [“You don’t lie before a court of law,” Judge Nunley admonished Zinnel. “You don’t continue to lie, which is what you did.” Judge Nunley found that Zinnel’s gifts of being articulate and charismatic were used toward promoting Zinnel’s “own selfish ends.”]  Federal prosecutors had this to report in their filed briefs: “[Zinnel] showed his true nature: ‘hateful, vindictive, and incorrigible,’ read the court papers.  More on that HERE.

Zinnel got fined that $500,000 that is mentioned on nearly all of the bankruptcy paperwork that debtors have to acknowledge.  He also ended up having to forfeit almost $3 million of his assets to the government, and let’s not forget the time that you do for doing the crime that you did: more than 17 years!  Here’s a copy of the Prelim Order:

Download (PDF, 192KB)

We asked on this site, “can you make someone do the right thing?”. We were writing about our Pisces, Ms. Proctor.  We certainly hope she is reading this post, along with her attorneys.  This story is directly relevant to her, and she (and they) certainly know why! It’s time to be honest. Even Teresa, from the Real Housewives of New Jersey is doing it. SEE?

 

More found below:

http://www.justice.gov/usao/cae/news/docs/2013/07-2013/07-17-13Zinnel.html

http://www.sacbee.com/2014/03/05/6210229/man-who-hid-assets-in-divorce.html

give a chance

A Fraudster’s Deposition Can Be Useful

The story of John Beale who worked as a high-ranking official at the EPA while lying for years about being a CIA agent, has been written about extensively.  You can see one story on it by clicking HERE.  He referred to his tendency of lying as “something like an addiction”.  He was able to fraudulently get $900,000 and other benefits from our government while working for it.  Mr. Beale was deposed by the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform in December of 2013.  There is a lot that you can learn about fraud by reading the transcript of the fraudster’s deposition.  Here are some of the highlights from that 263 page deposition:

 

After a quick check-in to ensure that Mr. Beale understood that knowingly providing false testimony could subject him to criminal prosecution (PG 10), he went on to confirm that he had been able to take advantage of flaws in management at the EPA (PG 41).

 

He reported that people didn’t ask him to provide verification because they blindly trusted him.

 

He went on to say that “..you think you know them and you think you can trust them..” (PG 42)

 

It was refreshing to see him honestly report that he “..abused that trust and.. betrayed that trust..”.

 

Paperwork that would have verified information given/reported wasn’t demanded by the immediate supervisor who in fact was Beale’s buddy.  (nice to have friends at work who will cover for you)

 

He profited from that lie, at the expense of the Federal government and taxpayers.

He self-surrendered, which undoubtedly led to him being sentenced with the time that he did (32 months), as opposed to what could have happened had they had to chase him down and unravel false statements and doctored documents attempting to provide false alibis. His liquidation of his assets in order to immediately repay the government a substantial amount of his fraudulently received money, helped him also in the end.  He also liquidated all of his retirement funds, including his Thrift Savings Plan and mutual fund accounts.

 

He also received handicapped parking based on his fraudulent claim of being a Vietnam veteran with malaria.  He DIDN’T have malaria, and he didn’t even serve in Vietnam.  That lie of his cost the EPA (and the taxpayers) about $8000 per year.  They also found that he had abused his travel vouchers (remember, where there is smoke, there is fire).

 

His deposition is definitely a good read.  The Oversight folks got a lot of material to work with as they try to unravel the puzzle of who did what and who knew what.  Weeds need a fertile environment in order to grow, so you have to learn what makes the environment fertile if you want to kill them.  He did the best thing he could when he said the following:  “You see a pattern here of me lying to and deceiving people who trusted me, and in hindsight, I can’t see a good purpose other than, you  know, manipulating them.” (PG 150)  That was the TRUTH.

 

The whole deposition can be found by clicking HERE

 

half truth